Exhibition of Royal Garments for Women

Featured on prestigious media outlets such as Noblesse and The Korea Times, the Korea Furniture Museum in Seong-buk, Seoul, is currently hosting an exhibition for royal Korean wedding costumes by K-Silk Kim.

The exhibition shows the process of a Korean queen’s attire for a wedding, beginning with the queen’s soft-toned undergarments and continuing on to three layers of a jacket-like garment called “jeogori” in Korean, which is usually violet, green, deep-blue, and white. She would also have to wear three layers of a gold-gilded skirt.

K-Silk Kim(owner of this blog!), showing the Korean traditional undergarments of the Queen on her wedding day.

As important as a Korean royal wedding was(being the bond for royal families and Korean history), the day of the official royal wedding requires an arduous dress routine. After the queen has her undergarments and three layers each of “jeogori” and skirts on, the queen then puts on the inner red gown, and then the full outer gown and coats for the official marriage day.

The outer clothing of Korean kings and queens are usually a very regal red or blue, while those of princes and princesses were of the purple or green color scheme.

The photos above show what the king and queen would look like for the royal wedding. The king would have to wear a hat with heavy jewels attached to it, and the queen would also have to wear a heavy headpiece.

The exhibition also shows the outfits the king and queen wore on their first night as a married couple.

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Detail was a very important factor in creating the exhibition, in order to present to visitors of the Korea Furniture museum an image closest as possible to a real royal wedding. There is intricate planning and detail not only in the clothes but also with the setting of the background, props, and the dolls, too.

The last part of the exhibition features Queen Yoon(Empress Sunjong)’s yellow-gold ceremonial robes.

Visitors were impressed with the accuracy of the exhibition and the passion that was implied in the creation of such beautiful traditional clothing.

Image/content credits:
Kim Ji-soo, http://m.koreatimes.co.kr/phone/news/view.jsp?req_newsidx=220289

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